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Workplace injury on farms are decreasing despite many hazards

| Dec 4, 2014 | Workers' Compensation |

Each year, a significant number of farmers and their workers are injured while going about their regular duties.  According to those who have been farming for many years, safety on farms was not really a priority a half century ago. Fortunately, a current focus on safe working conditions has led to a decrease in the number of people who suffer a workplace injury on farms across the United States. In Tennessee, an emphasis on making equipment safer and creating awareness of safety practices has contributed to fewer injuries to farmers.

It appears as if farmers entering the field are more safety conscious than a few decades ago, which can be ascribed to better safety education. Farmers and farm workers appear to be more aware of the dangers of their job. Accidents can happen very quickly when one is working with animals and machinery.

Tractor and skid loader accidents seem to be one of the leading causes of fatal and serious accidents on farms. By attaching a rollover protective structure to the equipment, it becomes much safer. Although newer models do have this protective feature, there are still many older models currently used which offer no such protection.

Workplace injuries, especially on farms, can be life-changing and can lead to an inability to work and other life altering circumstances. A worker in Tennessee who has suffered a workplace injury may be entitled to file for workers’ compensation benefits. Damages awarded in a successful workers’ compensation claim may assist the injured worker in dealing with many of the expenses, such as medical and rehabilitation costs, as well as loss of income for any time missed from the job while recovering.

Source: triblive.com, “Farm accidents decrease as safety awareness grows“, Joe Napsha, Nov 30, 2014

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