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What is a trial work period with Social Security disability?

On Behalf of | Aug 30, 2021 | Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) |

Not every Tennessee resident who is approved for and is receiving Social Security disability benefits is completely unable to work. Many can perform certain tasks and want to try and get back in the workforce or run their own business despite the illness, condition or injury that warranted their application for SSD benefits being approved. Still, many are fearful that trying to work will negatively impact their benefits if they find their issues are still a problem. One aspect that should be understood from the outset is the trial work period.

Knowing about the trial work period is essential when getting SSD benefits

Those receiving SSD have options when making a work attempt. It is imperative to adhere to the rules to ensure the person does not lose his or her benefits when getting back into the workforce or operating a business. The trial work period is key and it gives the person the chance to try and work without harming their SSD benefits for at least nine months. Earnings while working are irrelevant and the person will continue to get the full amount of SSD benefits.

The amount a person can earn changes periodically. For 2021, any month in which the person earns more than $940 is categorized as a trial work month. For those who are self-employed, it is either working 80 hours in a month or earning more than $940 following outlays for the business. The nine months can happen within 60 months and do not need to be consecutive.

Understanding the rules for SSD benefits in all situations is crucial

In many instances, a person who meets the criteria to be approved for Social Security disability benefits also strives to get back into the workforce. That can have its obstacles and disability recipients are frequently fearful that simply trying to work might result in their benefits being reduced or stopped. That is not the case and one way to try and work while getting SSD benefits is to use the trial work period. For this and any other concern regarding SSD benefits from the application process, appeals and beyond, it may be useful to have experienced help to address any issue that might arise.

 

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