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Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) Archives

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - New Program Aimed at Reducing Backlog

When it comes to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims, there is nothing more frustrating than the length of time claims are at the hearing office before hearings are held. Just last week, I posted an update on the average processing times and approval rates for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cases at the hearing level. Recently, the Social Security Administration (SSA) announced the creation of a "National Adjudication Tean" (NAT) as a tactic to reduce the hearing level backlog. In the past, hearing offices have utilized senior attorneys to review claims likely to be found favorable at a hearing and then process on-the-record (OTR) decisions. These were usually claims with older claimants (55 and over) who's claim could be granted based on an application of a grid rule.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Approval and Wait Time Statistics

I recently looked at the total length of times five of my Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims took from start to finish. Now I will take my regular look at the processing times and approval rates for Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims for East Tennessee and Eastern Kentucky. Please remember that these statistics are only for claims pending at the hearing level or Office of Disability Adjudication and Review. The claims at a hearing office have already been through the Application and Reconsideration steps (typically 6-12 months of waiting already).

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Length of Claims

I periodically write about the average processing times for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims at the hearing offices. For instance, my latest update on this was on June 4, 2015. The average processing times and hearing wait times are growing and are inexcusable. However, we are apt to forget that these claims have already been through the application and reconsideration levels. I am often asked by claimants and potential clients how long the process takes if the claim goes all the way through to a hearing and I often say it can take up to two years.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - 10 Reasons Cases are Lost

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cases are typically won or lost on the strength of the medical evidence and the credibility of the claimant. However, if you are an attorney representing claimants, there are certain things you should always remember in preparing a case for hearing.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Hearing Wait Times

On April 26, 2015, I posted the average processing times and approval rates for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claims for East Tennessee and Eastern Kentucky. Already, the numbers need to be updated. Please remember that these statistics are only for claims pending at the hearing level or Office of Disability Adjudication and Review. The claims at a hearing office have already been through the Application and Reconsideration steps (typically 6-12 months of waiting already).

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - EAJA Fees

I recently blogged about Attorney Fees in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) cases, but there are instances where attorneys can get paid for work performed before the federal court under the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA). To aid individuals have access to the Court systems to remedy unjust governmental action by paying attorney fees and costs, the Federal government enacted the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA). 5 U.S.C. § 504; 28 U.S.C. § 2412. To receive payment under EAJA, several criteria must be met:

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Attorney Fees

I am often asked about how attorneys are paid on Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) (technically non-attorney representatives are paid the same way, but see about the "Dangers of Non-Attorney Reps in Social Security"). First, any fee charged or collected by a representative must be approved by the Social Security Administration. It is a federal crime otherwise!

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Auxiliary Beneficiaries

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits may be paid directly to a disabled worker or another person may draw benefits as a result of that worker. Auxiliary beneficiaries encompass dependency and survivor benefits that first require a wage earner who met entitlement requirements. The following are types of auxiliary beneficiaries:

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Useful Resources

Today, even compared to ten years ago, useful resources for the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or SSI attorney are everywhere. The cost can range from nothing for readily available materials on the internet to hundreds of dollars for multi-volume treatises. Apart from traditional resource material (paper or electronic), an attorney now also has more wide ranging opportunities to connect to other attorneys and professionals practicing disability law or an allied profession. None of the resources mentioned below are meant as an advertisement or endorsement, but are exemplary, with the realization that many more probably exist that are equally good.

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - Offset

When a person is receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, the monthly amounts can affect or be affected by other benefits or amounts recovered under other federal, state, and/or private benefit policies. Of course, monthly SSDI benefits can affect a person's eligibility for SSI benefits under the federal statutes or can at least reduce those amounts to a smaller amount. Since SSI is a needs-based calculation, it does not matter where the assets come from so Title II benefits definitely can affect that calculation.

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